When on a tropical island, it can be fun to sample some of the local tropical fruits. Maui has plenty of farmers markets on a weekly basis that offer up a colorful assortment of fruits that can be purchased. Talk to the farmers first hand to learn more about the fruit, but we have assembled this list of commonly found fruit on Maui (we excluded fruits most of us all know already like coconut and pineapple). Think of this like one of those fish-identifier cards you get before you go snorkeling!

List of fruits you will find on Maui:

Lilikoi – A very sweet/tart fruit that is yellow in color and is found in many local jams/jellies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guava – Usually ranging in size from a golf ball to a baseball, guavas can be a bit hard to eat because of the countless amount of BB-sized seeds inside, but are great for blending into drinks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strawberry Guava – Known as waiwi (pronounced vai-vee) to locals, you may spot these golfball-sized greenish/redish fruits on various hiking trails around the island. If they are red, they are ready for the picking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Star fruit – When this fruit is cut correctly, you can enjoy little bite-sized star-shaped pieces of joy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dragon Fruit – This fruit looks like a neon pink dragon.  A couple places on Maui that specialize in acai bowls also have bowls made from dragon fruit because of the bright pink color.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lychee – We have yet to meet someone that doesn’t like lychee.  Think of a skinned grape bursting with sweet flavor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mango – Mangoes are also a visitor favorite. Be sure to let the mango turn yellow/orange on the outside before cutting it open to eat. Also be careful as some people can be allergic to the mango sap, which can have a similar effect on the skin as poison ivy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bread fruit – In my opinion this is kind of a dud of a fruit, but because of its size and weight, it is often easy to spot.  There are a couple recipes that call for boiling or frying the fruit, with an end result tasting similar to a potato.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Papaya – Papaya trees have somewhat thin trunks and short branches.  Once ripe, cut the papaya in half and scoop out all the seeds with a spoon. You are then left with a tasty fruit that kinda tastes like a mix between a cantaloupe and a mango.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rambutan – Don’t let the hairy/spiky exterior fool you.  These fruits are very similar to lychee but not as sweet.

 

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